May 17, 2018

“I’m looking for a mystery.”

It's a simple request, but I confess -- I was surprised the first time I heard it from a teen reader. In the rapidly expanding and increasingly genre-blended world of YA lit, something as clear-cut as mystery seemed like a throwback to me. Since then, thankfully, I've learned a thing or two about the appeal of YA mystery, and I want to share some of my favorite readers' advisory tools for keeping up with this enduring genre.

Crack the case with Recommended Reads

Genre-based reading assignment? A personal passion for whodunits? Whatever the motivation, teen mystery readers can find out what's good and what's new with Recommended Reads lists. There are two ways to find the lists in NoveList:               

  • BROWSE: Click on the "Teen" tab in NoveList's Recommended Reads panel, then select "Mysteries and Thrillers"
  • SHORTCUT: Search ND Recommended Reads AND GX Mysteries AND RL 2 to see all of NoveList's YA mystery lists in one spot, including lists for fans of TV mysteries such as Riverdale and Sherlock. (To learn how to create your own shortcuts, check out our guide to field codes.)

For mystery-lovers who prefer self-directed readers' advisory, print this flyer and add it to a display of recent YA mysteries. 

Still feel like you're missing vital evidence?

Try Heather Booth's genre outline, All About Mysteries for Teens (search for it by title, or go directly to UI 437193). Besides defining genre characteristics and identifying key authors, the outline also features RA advice for helping teens who are already browsing the adult mystery shelves.

Investigate further with NoveList

Now that you know how easy it is to find mysteries, why not explore ways to search for slightly more unusual YA fare -- memoirs, perhaps, or magical realism? Whatever it is you’re looking for, you'll be well-served by our genre and appeal books and tutorials, not to mention our search strategies, which show you how to use NoveList's unique metadata to find books that feature diverse characters, or support summer reading, or are just right for tweens.

With all these tools at your fingertips, you (and the teen readers in your library) can follow the clues to some truly arresting reads.

A version of this post appeared in one of our Book Squad emails. To get tips like this emailed directly to your inbox, sign up!


Rebecca Honeycutt is a Readers' Advisory Librarian at NoveList.





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